Tributes

For the first time ever, ALL Tributes are discounted 10%. This includes plaques, bricks, plaque mugs, bench memorials, and "Folds of Honor". This is your chance to leave a lasting legacy for a loved one. To claim this offer simply select the Sale Price option when you checkout online.

Gift Certificates are available. Contact us at tributes@nimitzfoundation.org for more information.

All Tributes are 100% tax-deductible

Purchase a Tribute

Never Be Forgotten

You can honor a loved one or hero - and make them part of this extraordinary Museum. Pay tribute to those who have had an impact on your life - military or non-military - through a variety of programs.

Group 4

About Tributes at the National Museum of the Pacific War

For questions or information on any of the below please CONTACT Stephanie Hagee, Director of Tributes at tributes@nimitzfoundation.org or 830-997-8600 x215

Purchase a Tribute
Brick Legacy

Commemorative bricks offer an opportunity to support the future of the National Museum of the Pacific War while becoming part of history.

Leave a Permanent Mark Three lines can tell a story and this is proven in our Walk of Honor. Your brick places a lasting legacy in our Walk of Honor and helps us to remember those who have made a difference one brick at a time. Bricks are a timeless token through which ANY one person, group, unit, or ship can be honored. Bricks can be for military or non-military. The Walk of Honor celebrates and remembers everyone who has had an impact on someone else's life.

Program Inclusions:

  • Three lines of text
  • 20 spaces in each line( including blank spaces)
  • Symbols can be special ordered
  • Price includes brick engraving and a mailed certificate once the brick has been laid.

Additional Options:

  • For a donation of $30 you can have a framed picture of the brick mailed along with the certificate
  • For a donation of $30 you can lay the brick yourself and have a dedication ceremony at the Museum's Walk of Honor

Featured Plaque

Joseph “Joe” Roll --- and, oh, how he rolled. The country views him as a hero. “The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to ARM2 Joseph E. Roll for extraordinary achievement in aerial combat as a rear-seat gunner in an airplane of a Scouting Squadron in action against Japanese forces in the Battle of the Coral Sea on May 8, 1942…” Numerous accolades can be listed when describing Joe Roll, yet he was just a normal 18-year-old “kid” wanting to fight for what he believed in and signed up to serve in the Navy during WWII. Joe probably couldn’t fathom what he might see in terms of the realities of war and like so many WWII sailors he needed to find an outlet for the everyday stressors. So being creative he strapped on his rollerskates from home and promenaded up and down the deck of the USS Yorktown!! His rollerskates actually went down with the ship when it was torpedoed and sunk in the Battle of Midway, June 7, 1942. According to his son, John Roll, Joe liked to joke that his skates were lost to history so to speak because they now rested on the floor of the Pacific Ocean. So, next time you’re at the museum, “roll” on over to the Bush Gallery Wall, Section 5, Row 3 and check out Joe’s story.

View Plaque

Featured Brick

“The memories of a man in his old age are the deeds of a man in his prime.”

Marvin Miller -- a man who captivates you with his smile and quick wit, but on the inside is a man still in turmoil and dealing with the stressors of PTSD and the emotional impact the Vietnam War has on him every day. Marvin didn’t want any fuss, his only request was that he could have his brick placed near his dad’s (a WWII veteran). As with most veterans, it was more about the “other guy” than himself. Marvin’s brick in the courtyard is unassuming yet those 3 lines tell a story of a man who did his duty for his country but came back to a country that did not welcome him with open arms. His brick signifies the need for all Vietnam vets to be thanked and appreciated and the plight of those with PTSD. So, next time you’re at the museum take a moment to stroll down to Section 38, Row 28 of the Brick Walkway, and give silent thanks to Marvin and all those Vietnam Veterans who sacrificed so much yet never received the outpouring of thanks they so wholeheartedly deserved.



Our family had placed a plaque on the courtyard wall of a relative. They performed a wonderful dedication service for us.

Jan Jurgens


Find a Brick or Plaque in the Memorial Courtyard